top of page

USA PLACEMENT PROGRAM

We also provide a U.S. Scholarship Consulting service through our
contacts and network of schools to assist student-athletes in navigating the
highly competitive recruitment process. We make sure each player receives the most suitable academic and athletic scholarship offers available.

PLACEMENT PROGRAM PROCESS

STEP 1: Online application and initial interview
STEP 2: Signing the EWBA Agreement
STEP 3: Documentation
STEP 4: 
Offers and applying to school
STEP 5: Sign I-20
STEP 6: USA Visa

Online application and initial interview

After you complete our online application, one of our staff members will reach out to you within the next 48 hours to schedule a conference call

At this point you will receive offers from schools, and start application process. We will assist you and be your support throughout the entire process.

Signing the EWBA Agreement

After you sign EWBA agreement, we officially start presenting you to coaches and schools

Sign I-20

This document is issued by school and means you are officially enrolled

Documentation

To start the process, you will have to send us your highlight video, transcripts, exams
passed (SAT, ACT & TOEFL) etc.

USA Visa

Last step is to apply for USA Visa and you are ready for departure

IMG_7889 2.HEIC

TYPE OF SCHOOLS

TOEFL, SAT & ACT scores

TOEFL is a necessary test for foreign students looking to attend school in the United States and measures how well the student knows English in 4four different sections: Reading and Answering Questions, Listening, Speaking, Essay, and Composition Writing.

 

The SAT is a necessary test for those wishing to attend a 4-year College or University. It’s divided into 3 sections: Math, Reading, Writing/Essay

The ACT contains four multiple-choice tests—English, mathematics, reading, and science—and an optional writing test.

HIGHLIGHT TAPE

Having a basketball highlight video is the most important thing a young and upcoming player needs to have. This is super important if you want to be recruited and receive a sports scholarship. 

The video needs to be of professional quality (resolution) so it's easy for coaches to view. It should be clearly organized and showcase the different skills you possess (Shooting, Passing, Ballhandling, Defense, Athleticis
m, etc.) It should also contain games from the current as well as the previous season. It is extremely important that the video is interesting throughout and showcases all of your attributes so it leaves coaches wanting to learn more about you after watching your film.

 

WHY INTERNATIONAL STUDENT-ATHLETES NEED TO HAVE A RECRUITING VIDEO

 

International athletes need to ensure that their recruiting video stands out and shows off their athletic ability and sport-specific skills to get–and stay–on a coach’s radar. It's unlikely that a college coach will be able to see you play in person, so they’ll want to see a recruiting video to evaluate you and see if you'd make a good fit for their team. 

 

Depending on your sport, coaches generally like to see two different types of videos... a highlight video and a skills video:

  • Highlight video - Coaches don’t have time to watch full-length games or competitions for every recruit. Compile the best clips of your game footage that highlight your talent and skill. 

  • Skills video - Unlike a highlight video, this video includes a series of staged sport-specific drills outside of an actual game or competition setting that showcases your technical abilities and mastery of a key skill. 

A5803642-6F31-4598-8D06-AA7A559CDCF8 2.JPG
IMG_7898 2.HEIC
IMG_7897 2.HEIC
download (4).png
download (3).png
download (2).png

What ARE THE DIFFERENCES?

What are the Key Differences Between the NCAA, NAIA & NJCAA?

College sports in the United States have an incredible history, with countless student-athletes making their mark on the sporting world. For many young athletes, securing a sports scholarship is the key to unlocking a college education while pursuing their athletic dreams. However, navigating the world of college sports can be daunting, with so many different governing bodies and scholarship opportunities available. In this blog post, we will explore the key differences between the NCAA, the NAIA, and the NJCAA collegiate governing bodies to help aspiring student-athletes make informed decisions about their future.

 

For our signed athletes at EWBA our expert team is there to support each athlete and ensure they end up competing for a school in a governing body and division that is the right fit for them both academically and athletically. Also, remember your degree is from where you finish not where you start so it might be that you start competing under one governing body or in a certain division and then move on to another once you have proven yourself at that particular college level.

National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)

The National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA, is the largest and most well-known governing body for college sports in the United States. Founded in 1906, the NCAA has over 1,100 member schools across three divisions, representing a wide range of sports, including basketball, football, and baseball etc.

Division I: Often regarded as the highest level of competition within the NCAA, Division I schools are typically large, well-funded institutions with significant athletic programs. Scholarships at the Division I level are highly competitive, and athletes must meet rigorous academic and athletic standards to be considered for a scholarship. Division I schools can offer full-ride scholarships, which cover tuition, room and board, and other expenses. Teams can’t get relegated or promoted across divisions so worth acknowledging that just because a school has Division I status it doesn’t necessarily mean they have a strong team in your particular sport or that is a better fit than any other governing body division

Division II: Division II schools are typically slightly smaller than Division I schools, but still offer highly competitive athletic programs. Scholarships at the Division II level are also highly competitive, but athletes may be able to secure partial scholarships to cover a portion of their expenses.

 

Division III: Division III schools do not offer athletic scholarships, but they do offer financial aid packages to student-athletes based on their academic achievements and financial need. Division III schools are typically smaller, liberal arts institutions that prioritize academics over athletics

National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA)

The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, or NAIA, is another governing body for four year college sports in the United States. Founded in 1937, the NAIA has over 250 member schools across the United States and Canada, representing a wide range of sports, including basketball, football, and soccer etc

Unlike the NCAA, the NAIA does not have divisions. Instead, the NAIA offers scholarships based on sport-specific equivalency, which means that scholarships can be split among multiple athletes in a given sport. For example, a soccer team may have 20 scholarship spots available, but those spots can be divided among 30 or more athletes on the team.

National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA)

The National Junior College Athletic Association, or NJCAA, is a governing body for two-year colleges and junior colleges in the United States. Founded in 1938, the NJCAA has over 500 member schools across the country, representing a wide range of sports, including basketball, football, baseball etc. The level of sport can still be very high, but academics are typically easier than that at a four-year school (NCAA or NAIA)

The NJCAA is divided into three divisions based on the level of competition and the size of the school.

Division I: Division I schools are typically larger institutions with very competitive athletic programs. Scholarships at the Division I level are highly competitive and can cover tuition, room and board, and other expenses.

Division II: Division II schools are typically slightly smaller than their Division I counterparts, but still offer very competitive athletic programs. Scholarships at the Division II level are also highly competitive and athletes are able to secure partial scholarships to cover a portion of their expenses.

Division III: Division III schools do not offer athletic scholarships, but they do offer financial aid packages to student-athletes based on their academic achievements and financial need. Division III schools are typically smaller, community colleges that prioritize academics over athletics.

Key Differences

Now that we’ve explored each governing body, let’s take a closer look at some of the key differences between the NCAA, the NAIA, and the NJCAA:

Size and Scope

The NCAA is the largest and most well-known governing body for college sports, with over 1,100 member schools across three divisions. The NAIA is a smaller governing body, with over 250 member schools, and the NJCAA is comparable with just over 500 member schools.

 

Scholarship Opportunities

The NCAA and NAIA both offer athletic scholarships to student-athletes, while the NJCAA offers scholarships at the Division I and II levels. However, Division III schools in the NCAA and NJCAA do not offer athletic scholarships but do offer academic scholarships.

 

Division Structure

The NCAA and NJCAA are both divided into three divisions based on various factors including the size of the school and facilities. The NAIA does not have divisions based on the size of the school, but instead offers scholarships based on sport-specific equivalency.

 

Eligibility Requirements

Each governing body has different eligibility requirements for student-athletes. The NCAA has strict academic and amateurism requirements, while the NAIA has less stringent academic requirements but still requires student-athletes to maintain their amateur status. The NJCAA has a more lenient academic requirement for student-athletes at Division I and II levels and doesn’t have a designated eligibility center.

 

Level of Competition

The level of competition varies between each governing body and division. The NCAA Division I has the highest level of competition and can often attract the most talented student-athletes but it doesn’t necessarily mean its sports teams are stronger than teams in other divisions or governing bodies. The NAIA and NJCAA offer competitive athletic programs and can offer competitive scholarships that also attract top-level student-athletes. Teams can’t get relegated or promoted across divisions so worth acknowledging that just because a school has Division I status it doesn’t necessarily mean they have a strong team in your particular sport.

 

Cost of Attendance

The cost of attendance varies between each governing body and division. Four-year school costs can vary hugely from around $25k a year for tuition, food, and housing without scholarships up to over $70k a year at prestigious academic schools such as Harvard and Yale. In comparison, NJCAA two-year schools are typically around $15k a year for tuition, food, and housing without a scholarship, so it can potentially be a very good option financially especially when factoring in any scholarships.

 

Conclusion

In summary, each governing body for college sports in the United States offers unique scholarship opportunities, eligibility requirements, and levels of competition. Aspiring student-athletes should carefully research each governing body and division to determine which option is best suited for their athletic and academic goals. Ultimately, the decision to pursue a college sports scholarship should be based on a combination of factors, including athletic ability, academic achievements, and financial considerations. For our signed athletes our expert team is there to support our athletes and ensure they end up competing for a school in a governing body and division that is the right fit for them both academically and athletically.

HOW TO DETERMINE YOUR NCAA ELIGIBILITY

Here are the steps to determine your NCAA eligibility

1. Identify Your Academic Goals: Consider the academic path you intend to pursue in high school or secondary school.

2. Check Core Course Requirements: Review the NCAA’s list of approved core courses to ensure you’re taking the right classes.

3. Maintain a Strong GPA: Strive to maintain a high grade point average (GPA) in your core courses.

4. Meet Amateurism Rules: Ensure you comply with NCAA amateurism rules by avoiding any prohibited activities or benefits related to your sport.

5. Monitor Progress: Continuously check your academic progress to confirm that you’re on track to meet NCAA eligibility requirements.

6. Seek Guidance: Consult with your school counselor for assistance with meeting academic and eligibility requirements.

7. Communicate with Coaches: Maintain open communication with college coaches who are recruiting you to ensure they’re aware of your eligibility status.

8. Stay Informed: Stay up-to-date with NCAA rules and regulations, as they may change over time.

 

By following these steps, you can determine your NCAA eligibility and increase your chances of participating in college sports.

ARE INTERNATIONAL ATHLETES ELIGIBLE FOR
SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID?

International athletes are eligible to receive athletic and academic scholarships and even some types of financial aid. However, it’s always a good idea to check with the admissions and financial aid departments, or even ask the college coach if international athletes are eligible or ineligible for certain scholarships and financial aid opportunities.

  • Athletic scholarships. Full and partial athletic scholarships are offered at the NCAA D1, D2, NAIA, and NJCAA levels. Keep in mind that most athletic scholarships only cover a portion of the school’s tuition, room and board, and fees, but there are plenty of other financial aid and scholarship opportunities available for high-academic students or other specific criteria.

  • Academic scholarships. These are typically given to students who have a strong GPA, test scores, or a high (grad) class rank. Some schools also look at how challenging your coursework was in high school or offer scholarships (or credits) for AP or IB classes.

  • Non-academic scholarships. If you’re not sure whether your grades will qualify for an academic scholarship, many schools also offer non-academic scholarships for students. International athletes may qualify if they have a robust list of extracurriculars, leadership roles, volunteer work, and more! 

  • Financial aid. While international athletes aren’t eligible to receive U.S. federal student aid like grants or loans, some colleges and universities also have their own institutional aid they offer to both national and international athletes based on financial need.

  • Work study. Since participants must apply for federal aid to qualify for assistance, international athletes typically do not qualify for the Federal Work-Study program. 

  • Student loans. While international athletes do not qualify for federal student loans, they may qualify for private loans. Depending on the lender, you may need to find a co-signer who is a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, and/or has good credit. Keep in mind that, unlike a scholarship or grant, loans need to be repaid, with interest. 

NCAA ACADEMIC ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL ATHLETES

The NCAA Eligibility Center is responsible for ensuring student-athletes are academically eligible to compete at its member schools. Keep in mind that the NCAA Eligibility Center does not help or show athletes how to become eligible or how to maintain their eligibility. It’s the athlete’s responsibility to register for the NCAA Eligibility Center, keep track of their academic and amateurism requirements, and ensure they’re on track to meet those requirements. To compete in an NCAA program, international students must submit the following information:

  • Academic records. This may include grades, report cards, or transcripts for high school (or years nine and up) in your native language. These documents also need to be translated into English if English is not the native language

  • Graduation credentials. This can be a certificate, diploma, or a copy of your final leaving exams as long as it proves you graduated. 

  • Standardized test scores. Students must have the international testing center send their ACT or SAT scores directly to the NCAA using the code 9999. 

  • Complete 16 NCAA-approved core-course credits. These include courses in English or your native language, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, or comparative religion/philosophy. The number of credits for each type of course is different for Division 1 and Division 2 programs. 

  • Earn a minimum grade point average (GPA). D1 schools require a minimum GPA of 2.3 while D2 schools require a minimum GPA of 2.2. 

  • ACT or SAT test scores. D1 and D2 programs use sliding scales to match test scores and eligibility. For example, if you have a lower GPA, you need to achieve a higher test score. If you have a higher GPA, you can have a lower test score and still be eligible. 

  • Amateurism rules. The NCAA will ask you a number of questions about your educational background and athletic participation to determine if you qualify for amateurism status. 

NAIA ACADEMIC ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL ATHLETES

The NAIA Eligibility Center is responsible for ensuring student-athletes are academically eligible to compete at its member schools. Like the NCAA Eligibility Center, they are not responsible for making sure athletes meet eligibility requirements–it is the athlete’s responsibility to register for the NAIA Eligibility Center and to keep track of their grades, test scores, and graduating class rank. 

 

To compete in an NAIA program, any student-athlete from a high school outside of the U.S. or its territories, even if they are a U.S. citizen, must meet two of the three criteria after graduating high school:

  • Test score requirement. International athletes must take a standardized test, the ACT or SAT, on an international test date and achieve a minimum of 18 on the ACT or 970 on the SAT. The minimum SAT must be achieved on the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and Math sections only (the Writing score can’t be used). Athletes must have the testing center send their scores directly to the NAIA using the code 9876. 

  • Class rank requirement. International students need to graduate in the top half of their high school class. 

  • High school GPA requirement. International students need to achieve a minimum overall high school grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.

bottom of page